this post was submitted on 10 May 2024
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To those from the Western hemisphere, it's always fascinating to hear that some homes and businesses from the times of the Greek philosophers still have inhabitants, and then you remember that the Western hemisphere is itself not without its own examples, for example some Mexican villages still have temples from the times of the Mayans.

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[–] [email protected] 27 points 2 months ago (3 children)

The western hemisphere isn't just the Americas. It includes half of europe...

There are quite a few people in the western hemisphere that don't even bat an eye when they walk past a 1000 year old building on their way to work every day.

For me the oldest building is just a random house from the 13 century.

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

The western hemisphere isn’t just the Americas. It includes half of europe…

"Half" is stretching it. More like a slice: UK, Ireland, Iceland, Portugal, Spain and a slice of France.

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[–] [email protected] 20 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

The oldest building in/around Vienna is believed to be the Roman stone quarry in Leithaprodersdorf. It dates back to the Roman era, around 43 AD.

The oldest continuously inhabited building in Vienna is generally considered to be the Griechenbeisl, a historic restaurant located in the Innere Stadt district. It has been in operation since the 15th century.

[–] [email protected] 12 points 2 months ago (1 children)

LAFITTE'S BLACKSMITH SHOP BAR, circa 1730

[–] espentan 4 points 2 months ago

"Fitte" is a norwegian word for pussy, so apparently that was all it took to get a giggle out of me today.

[–] [email protected] 11 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

I live in a young city, so its from 1407.

[–] [email protected] 10 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

Well there's a park with some ruins from the Roman occupation, which founded this settlement in 79AD. If you count them, that's 1945 years... if not, apparently there are some churches between 800 and 900 years old that still contains some parts of the original Norman construction, although they have been altered since

[–] [email protected] 10 points 2 months ago

Surprise surprise, it's a church. Riddarholmen Church built in the 13th century.

[–] AnUnusualRelic 9 points 2 months ago

First or second century for the Roman baths. They're not in a great state though.

[–] [email protected] 9 points 2 months ago (4 children)

If you're talking white people, technically cooks cottage (built 30 years before the first fleet) but it was brought over and reassembled in the 1930's lol

Indigenous, probably the eel traps / farming system. That's 9,000 years old iirc

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[–] [email protected] 8 points 2 months ago (3 children)

Normal people houses don't survive much longer that 500-600 years bc on fire and bombing, but town hall, temple, fort, palace and other administration building can be much much older.

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[–] [email protected] 8 points 2 months ago (1 children)
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[–] [email protected] 8 points 2 months ago (1 children)

I live around the Yorkshire moors. There are dry stone walls up there which are up to 600 years old. I love walking up in the hills and thinking about that.

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[–] [email protected] 8 points 2 months ago

I actually don't know. The area I now live in was partially wiped out by the tsunami in 2011 closer to the coast. We definitely have some buildings that are a few hundred years old that are still in use. Different parts of Japan have older, but it's almost always a Ship of Theseus sort of situation.

[–] KISSmyOSFeddit 8 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

The student dorm I lived in was built as a monastery in 1491.
My current home town still has a guard tower built by the Romans.

[–] [email protected] 7 points 2 months ago

Probably less than 100 years, I live in New Zealand....

[–] [email protected] 7 points 2 months ago

The first Roman fort on the site of the castle was likely built around 55AD.

[–] [email protected] 7 points 2 months ago

I live in Athens, and the oldest home still standing is about 500 years old (start of 16th century)

[–] jeeva 7 points 2 months ago

Had to look it up, but "most probably" built between AD 1000–1050. Love that it's old enough that we're not entirely sure...

[–] MehBlah 7 points 2 months ago

Early 1800's. I grew up in a house that was built in 1905.

[–] suckmyspez 6 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

1130, St Margarets Chapel.

[–] [email protected] 6 points 2 months ago (1 children)

Domtrapphuset, the cathedral staircase house, built sometime between 1280 and 1330 AD. The cathedral the staircase (currently) leads to was finished in 1435.

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[–] [email protected] 6 points 2 months ago

The oldest building near where I live was believed to be built in 1640.

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

I believe the first building here was contracted around 1920-40

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago (1 children)

The tower of the old church was build around 1150, The rest of the church was build about 250 years ago.

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[–] meekah 5 points 2 months ago

We have a church in Berlin that was built in 1220-1230

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

Weve got Roman era ruins I think, but I cant find any info on the oldest standing building. Probably from the 13th-14th century.

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

It was built in the early 12th century.

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago) (2 children)

The oldest extant building is circa 1832, so ~192 years old - not much compared to some places but doing well for an Australian building.

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[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

I used to live in Regensburg, one of the northernmost Roman garrisons. So, the oldest remaining building (stone wall) is almost 2000 years old.

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

Nice trick to make ppl revel city they live in and possibly most of these ppl walk past it on semi regular basis so......

[–] [email protected] 5 points 2 months ago

I think it is an old church from around 1100. The oldest residential house is much younger, about 1550.

[–] notapantsday 4 points 2 months ago

The town I live in burned down almost completely in 1787, so most historic buildings in the city were built after that. The city wall is probably the oldest structure, but it's unknown when it was originally built. The oldest building with a known year of construction is most likely the church that was built in 1246.

[–] 9point6 4 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

We've got a pub from 1552 still standing and operating as a pub

We've got Roman ruins from 79AD too, but obviously they're not still a building really

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago

Bremen Cathedral's oldest part is from 1044, but there was a wooden church structure there in 789 until it was completely burned down by raiding Saxons.

[–] reversedposterior 4 points 2 months ago

Most sources suggest 1100s

[–] Iceblade02 4 points 2 months ago

There are archaeological finds of buildings from more than 9000 years ago (oldest in the region).

There's a church that was finished sometime during the 1200s and is preserved in its original form in the municipality, but technically it's not within town limits.

The main church was also initially built around that time but was rebuilt in the late 1700s - nothing of the original remains.

The cellar of a royal farm still remains, which was built in 1552, though it's more a ruin than a building.

A castle/royal manor was built in 1652, and although it has been renovated and expanded in the early 1700s, parts of the structure are still from the original.

So, I suppose it depends on what you're looking for.

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago
[–] xwolpertinger 4 points 2 months ago

I live in the countryside so there ain't a lot...

Excluding ruins, 11XX. The exact dates aren't really known

[–] Z3k3 4 points 2 months ago

There's some debate on the age of the old parish church where I live. It was either built on the 7th century or 1078

[–] epique 4 points 2 months ago

The oldest building would be the cathedral built between 1628 and 1633 although the city walls were built between 1613-1618 and are still standing and complete

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago

My grandma has a house, where a part of it was built by the romans

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago

Skara brae. 3150 bc

[–] j4k3 4 points 2 months ago

Spanish mission church 1782

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago

A church built in the mid 1500’s is the oldest building in my current town. I used to live in a farmhouse that was built in the early 1600’s.

[–] [email protected] 4 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

I lived "close" to Siem Reap and the oldest building is 900 year olds (Angkor Wat)

[–] Wizard_Pope 4 points 2 months ago

I think the oldest building would be the castle that eas first officially mentioned in 1004 AD and the first parts of the castle were built way before that.

[–] espentan 4 points 2 months ago* (last edited 2 months ago)

Gamle Aker Kirke, church from 1150 (Oslo).

[–] SpaceNoodle 4 points 2 months ago (2 children)
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