1
19
submitted 20 hours ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
2
8
submitted 3 days ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
3
19
submitted 1 week ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

A huge congratulations to @philipthalis on his well-deserved award.

Philip is undeniably both one of Australia's most respected architects and a tireless advocate for good urban design.

More importantly, he's not afraid to speak up publicly against bad state government planning decisions, as he did with Barangaroo, even when there's a personal cost.

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/architect-philip-thalis-paid-the-price-for-being-outspoken-now-he-s-won-the-profession-s-gold-medal-20240510-p5jcjb.html

@urbanism #Planning #UrbanPlanning #Cities #Urbanism #Buildings #Architecture #Transport #Architect #Walking #Walkability

4
26
submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
5
23
submitted 2 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Inklusibo’s new manual on housing rights provides an in-depth narrative of the urban poor’s right to housing and livable spaces. This is the first free publication under the Housing and Living Spaces category.

6
52
submitted 3 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

Why do alt-history people never focus on infrastructure or innovation? What would have happened had bikes been invented centuries before cars instead of around the same time? How different would the built environment and our culture have looked?

Personally, I think centuries of more established bike use would have created an infrastructure that limits how well cars take off. Cities would have entrenched themselves in a cheap, dense manner of transit.

I could be wrong, lots of dense cities were wrecked by the car when it was commercialized. I'd love to hear any thoughts :)

7
13
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
8
164
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
9
109
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
10
12
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
11
31
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://slrpnk.net/post/8079352

Instead of putting in more drainage pipes, building flood walls and channeling rivers between concrete embankments, which is the usual approach to managing water, Mr. Yu wants to dissipate the destructive force of floodwaters by slowing them and giving them room to spread out.

Mr. Yu calls the concept “sponge city” and says it’s like “doing tai chi with water,” a reference to the Chinese martial art in which an opponent’s energy and moves are redirected, not resisted.

12
13
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
13
24
Why Cities Should Farm (www.youtube.com)
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
14
2
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKoUX1YxkQ0
In case anyone was wondering how life is outside the former Iron Curtain.

As someone born and raised in such an environment, I can safely say that all the points raised in this video are valid.

I currently do live in a denser area, but you can clearly tell it's just not such a lively area. You do get to travel for a while to do your errands or hang out with people, as most people usually go downtown to get to the "third place", as the old town is filled with bars, pubs, restaurants etc. And indeed, transit connectivity is good, but the years of neglect in the 1990s and early 2000s gave it a bad rep., so people were more inclined to get a car and ask for more car infrastructure. And yes, newer supermarkets post 1990 were indeed built with fairly large acres of land dedicated to parking.

15
42
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
16
38
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
17
18
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

These local heroes are making a mark in their communities — through bringing green spaces back to life, creating a cultural hub in the shape of a cinema and turning a home into an artwork

18
60
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
19
107
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
20
11
How to Escape From the Iron Age? (solar.lowtechmagazine.com)
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
21
7
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://aus.social/users/ajsadauskas/statuses/112121946640090153

Waverley Park — Melbourne's car-dependent suburban AFL stadium with a planned seated capacity of over 150,000 (not a typo!)

A really good run down by @philip on the plans by the AFL (and its predecessor, the VFL) to build the world's largest stadium in outer-suburban Melbourne.

Unfortunately, a planned railway line past the stadium to Rowville was never built. That meant a massive 25,000-spot car park as the only real means to get there.

While most of it has been demolished and redeveloped for housing, the oval itself still used by Hawthorn Football Club as a training and administration centre.

https://youtu.be/LvvLwiRCx4s?si=x2QvxepgPtBtJZfx

@fuck_cars #AFL #Urbanism #UrbanPlanning #cars #stadium #stadia #Melbourne #sport #footy #football #stadiums #history #Victoria #VicPol #Australia #planning #Hawthorn #AusPol #CarBrain

22
44
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
23
20
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://aus.social/users/ajsadauskas/statuses/112105256146111201

Sydney has opened up consultation on a strategy to reduce car traffic and make the city more walkable

"Driving in central Sydney will become harder under a plan to make the city more comfortable for pedestrians.

"The City of Sydney wants to narrow roads for wider footpaths and push for lower speed limits to discourage drivers from the CBD and transform Sydney into a walkable city.

"The council will also install more pedestrian crossings and prioritise people over cars... five times more pedestrians than motorists on the average street, yet just 40 per cent of road space is allocated to footpaths."

https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/greener-safer-calmer-the-plan-to-discourage-drivers-from-central-sydney-20240312-p5fbr7.html

Some key points of the strategy are:

We will ensure that there is sufficient space for people to walk.

We will improve connectivity for people walking by ensuring there are frequent street crossings that give people priority and that align with people’s walking routes.

We will ensure that footpaths and crossings are accessible so that everyone can use them.

We will plan our city based on 10-minute neighbourhoods so that people are able to meet their daily needs easily by walking.

We will make it safer for people to walk by reducing vehicle speeds.

We will reduce traffic volumes on surface streets and manage through-traffic in residential neighbourhood streets to improve both safety and experience for people walking.

We will work to make all people feel safer while walking around our city.

We will work to improve compliance with road rules, especially the lesser-known rules that benefit people walking.

We will make our streets and public spaces comfortable and inviting by ensuring that they
are green and cool.

We will make sure that there are frequent opportunities for people to stop and rest, use the toilet or have a drink of water.

We will make our city more pleasant to walk in by reducing noise and air pollution from
traffic.

We will make all streets interesting to walk along by ensuring that built form has active, permeable frontages that invite engagement and curiosity.

We will use design, activations and installations to create neighbourhood-based community and encourage people to interact with their streets.

Full details here: https://www.cityofsydney.nsw.gov.au/policy-planning-changes/your-feedback-walking-strategy-action-plan#strategy

Unfortunately, the car-brained leader of the local business lobby isn't on board:

"Business Sydney executive director Paul Nicolaou welcomed efforts to make the city pedestrian-friendly... But Nicolaou said it was difficult to see how making Sydney a predominantly walking city would benefit businesses such as retailers."

(Worth repeating that 80% of people on an average city street are pedestrians, so it already is a predominantly walking city.)

Anyway, if you think the plan's a good idea, make sure you let the Sydney City Council know by emailing [email protected]

#urbanism #UrbanPlanning #Sydney @fuck_cars #walking #walk #walkability #nswpol #auspol #nsw #planning #cities #UrbanGreening #city #cities #australia

24
6
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
25
32
submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

I love systems that turn a problem into an asset. It's the kind of balanced improvement we're almost taught is impossible. So cities capturing storm water, effectively turning floodwater into drinking water they can use by allowing it to filter back down into the aquifer, seems like a great move. Especially when it comes with green areas that improve city life, lower daytime temperatures, and reduce the heat island effect.

view more: next ›

Solarpunk Urbanism

1520 readers
24 users here now

A community to discuss solarpunk and other new and alternative urbanisms that seek to break away from our currently ecologically destructive urbanisms.

founded 2 years ago
MODERATORS