Chemistry

551 readers
20 users here now

founded 2 years ago
MODERATORS
1
 
 

Not very practical, but the chemistry is interesting. Producing a strong acid from a weak acid by using precipitation as the driving force is something I don't see very often.

2
 
 

A bit of analytical chemistry for a change. I had never heard of a pycnometer!

3
 
 

Very useful video. Nitrate salts are a foundational feedstock in amateur (and professional) chemistry.

4
 
 

NurdRage has published a couple videos on oleum synthesis:

Still optimizations to be done, but cool work so far. I love that one of the OG chemistry YouTubers is still doing interesting work.

5
10
submitted 1 month ago* (last edited 1 month ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]
 
 

A long-time viewer of Periodic Videos grew up to study chemistry, and invented a new synthetic route for thalidomide.

Also, TIL that thalidomide still has several medical uses, as long as the recipients are not pregnant.

6
 
 
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
 
 

Cody Reeder makes thermite and has a nice "campfire".

19
 
 

The manual for my dishwasher says to refill salt just before running a wash cycle, because if any grains of salt spill onto the stainless steel interior it will corrode. If it runs right away, no issue because the salt is quickly dissolved, diluted, and flushed.

So then I realized when I cook pasta I heavily salt the water (following the advice that pasta water should taste as salty as the ocean). But what happens when I leave that highly salty brine in a pot, sometimes for a couple days to reuse it? Does that risk corroding the pots?

20
21
22
23
 
 

If you don't want to watch the entire video, it's a Carborane acid.

I'd love to see what the molecular orbitals look like. It's not every day that you see carbon forming six "bonds".

24
25
 
 

cross-posted from: https://lemmy.dbzer0.com/post/12359577

There are a few youtube videos where someone suggests using sulfuric acid to clean a secondary plate-style heat exchanger (for example). Yet I’ve heard sulfuric acid is extremely corrosive to metal, so something seems off about that advice. I certainly would not want an internal leak to cause radiator fluid to enter the tap water. I saw a drop of sulfuric acid land on a galvanized steel pipe once and within minutes it was rusted on the spot.

This guy also says sulfuric acid is an option but also says there is a safer alternative acid -- yet he did not mention what it is! Does anyone know?

This guy says he uses an ultrasonic bath but he does not say what chemicals he uses. Would distilled white vinegar be good for this?

Note these questions are very loosely related to this thread which describes a problem I am having, but really it’s a separate discussion. Secondary exchangers need periodic maintenance regardless of whether this is my current problem. I saved my previously clogged heat exchanger from a few years ago so I could work on cleaning it. I have a quite small ultrasonic I could try, but I cannot submerge the whole exchanger. I would have to stand it on end and only clean a few centimeters deep.

view more: next ›