sorted by: new top controversial old
[-] TSG_Asmodeus 3 points 4 hours ago

I dunno, I feel like helping fund a publicly funded hospitals new infant radiant warmer is pretty far distant from tipping a landlord. Maybe that's my Canadian bias?

16
submitted 17 hours ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

As we welcome the warmth of the season, let us reflect on how your generosity can make a significant impact on the lives of newborns and their families by supporting this year’s Breath of Spring campaign.

Your donation will support the purchase of an infant radiant warmer for the maternity ward at Kootenay Lake Hospital. This equipment uses gentle radiant heat to maintain the body temperature of newborns who require assistance after their birth. It is equipped with an overhead lamp to pre-warm the mattress and is especially helpful in providing soothing warmth for premature babies.

The infant radiant warmer has integrated controls, such as oxygen and suction, for clinicians to use when resuscitating babies. It also comes with a scale for the baby’s first weigh in.

Visit www.klhf.org to learn more about this state of the art equipment and to make your secure donation online.

82
submitted 1 day ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

Almost a week after some of his officers violently cleared out a peaceful Palestine solidarity protest on the University of Alberta campus, Edmonton Police Chief Dale McPhee finally showed up Thursday to make his case at a police commission meeting.

But not before the doors were locked and the public was barred from the meeting because 100 or so still-peaceful protesters made the official participants nervous.

Notwithstanding the metal detectors and heavy security at Edmonton City Hall since a shooting in January, protesters were told they’d have to watch the proceedings online because, in the words of commission chair John McDougall, “we had our back to a very, very large crowd. Admittedly they were peaceful… but when you know you have angry people behind you and you can’t see what’s going on, that’s a bit of a challenge.”

Well, nobody likes criticism. I guess no one thought to suggest that if it made them that uncomfortable to have people staring at their backs and grumbling, they could always turn their chairs around. Really, people, you can’t make this stuff up.

For his part, McPhee can be heard on various news organizations’ broadcasts claiming that his officers “protect free speech and we protect the very essential right of free expression, when both police and protesters respect their rights and responsibilities.”

On Saturday, in the chief’s opinion, those protesters’ responsibilities, apparently, included not camping on the campus of a public university even though there’s plenty of legal opinion that in fact they had every right to do just that.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 3 points 1 day ago

Maintenance costs naturally increase over time

You guys get maintenance in your rentals?

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 4 points 1 day ago* (last edited 1 day ago)
[-] TSG_Asmodeus 7 points 1 day ago* (last edited 1 day ago)

I can confirm this person is Canadian, due to their reply (immediately) containing a favourable comparison between Canada and the US.

And I completely agree with the rest of their comments. Evil Milhouse is going to also try to attack abortion, remove dental from healthcare, etc.

9
submitted 2 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

British Columbia's chief veterinarian has issued an order making it illegal to transport boats or other watercraft without removing the drain plug to prevent the spread of whirling disease.

Whirling disease, which is fatal in fish, is caused by a microscopic parasite that mainly targets salmon and trout. The Ministry of Water, Land and Resource Stewardship says the order takes effect on Friday and is also intended to keep invasive mussels out of B.C. waterways.

Boat operators are required to clean, drain and dry all watercraft and remove all mud, sand and plants before leaving the shore.

Vessels will also have to dry out for at least 24 hours before entering new waters.

The ministry says inspectors will be checking watercraft for compliance with the new orders.

Whirling disease causes deformities in fish and has a high mortality rate but poses no health risk to people swimming in or drinking water that contains the parasite responsible for the condition.

14
submitted 2 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

A man who attacked a SkyTrain attendant in New Westminster, B.C., in 2021 has been sentenced to 10 years in prison.

A statement from Metro Vancouver Transit Police says Howard Geddes Skelding was found guilty of one count each of assault causing bodily harm and forcible confinement.

Police say Geddes Skelding, who was 29 at the time of the attack, followed the attendant as she entered an employee room, then exposed himself, punched her in the stomach and shoved her to the ground.

The woman was able to fight off the attacker while calling for help and then managed to escape.

The man was arrested at the scene by Transit police and has been held in custody since the attack.

Transit police Const. Amanda Steed said they commend the attendant for her "strength and tenacity" in fighting her attacker, and extend their gratitude to the Crown for securing a meaningful sentence.

The B.C. Prosecution Service confirmed to CBC News that Geddes Skelding was designated a dangerous offender and sentenced to a jail term of 10 years minus credit for time served in pre-sentence custody. His sentence also includes a 10-year supervision order and a lifetime ban on owning firearms.

12
submitted 2 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

A British Columbia man was airlifted to a Calgary hospital Thursday after fending off a grizzly bear attack on a mountainside in the Rocky Mountains near the B.C.-Alberta border, according to RCMP.

Police said a father and son were tracking a bear west of Highway 43 south of Elkford, B.C., when the 36-year-old son was "attacked suddenly by an adult grizzly bear" around 3 p.m. PT.

"The man was able to defend himself with his firearm and the bear ran off," while his father called for help, Elk Valley RCMP said in a news release Friday morning.

The man, who police said lives in nearby Sparwood, B.C., suffered several injuries, including broken bones and cuts and scrapes on his body, the release said.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 4 points 2 days ago

"I want to work with sick people, but I also want to infect people as well."

This is one of the most infectious diseases in 100 years, but yeah lets not have healthcare workers vaccinated against it. Jesus.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 2 points 2 days ago

As another poster said, we used words like pr0n, and one that I personally have never used either of that replaces the "er" ending of a word with "a."

Hell, half of the time we used l33tsp33k was to avoid using specific words.

This is not a new thing.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 3 points 2 days ago

Used this recently on here, still seems fitting.

“It is difficult to get a man to understand something, when his salary depends upon his not understanding it.” -Upton Sinclair

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 2 points 2 days ago

Man, can you even still download that? Man, it's the only programme I can think of that I never had an issue with. Even the default skin is so usable.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 6 points 2 days ago

I still use, Jesus, version 5 or something. Nothing has managed to be as handy as old winamp.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 1 points 3 days ago

Not to be callous, but newsflash: businesses don’t care about the person, and your service does not matter to them. The old days of a owner valuing employees is gone as soon as you introduce MBA types just looking a budgets

Sounds like they need to be reminded why those things used to matter.

11
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

The provincial government has stepped in to override a B.C. Supreme Court decision and prevent a worsening homelessness crisis in Vancouver this summer.

Vancouver city council approved a bylaw in 2021 that limited rent increases between tenancies in single-room occupancy hotels, which provide 6,567 units of housing for people with low incomes, many with mental health and substance use challenges.

The city’s goal was to discourage landlords from evicting tenants and raising rents for the next occupants, which is allowed under B.C.’s rent controls.

But advocates warned evictions and rent increases had been increasing in the wake of the court decision that struck down the city bylaw.

Wendy Pedersen, a longtime advocate for SRO tenants, said she’s relieved to hear the province will step in.

“These evictions cause a lot of trauma. They’ve caused a lot of chaos in people’s lives, and a lot of chaos in the community,” Pedersen said.

“There are tenants... who’ve been hanging on for dear life, while their landlords have been pressuring them to leave.”

Single-room occupancy hotels are scattered throughout downtown Vancouver and the Downtown Eastside. The century-old buildings have small rooms, shared bathrooms and no kitchens and have become housing for Vancouver’s poorest residents.

12
submitted 3 days ago* (last edited 3 days ago) by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

A group of tenants who were displaced from their Metrotown apartment building four years ago are returning to live in the new development that took its place — and they will be paying their old rents.

It’s a milestone in the saga of “demovictions” in the city of Burnaby.

For much of the 2010s, real estate developers were scooping up old rental buildings in Metrotown to build new towers, driving out tenants. Many low-income people depended on those units, with settlement agencies even placing new immigrants and refugees in them. The neighbourhood, where the city was channelling density, became a dramatic site of protest and transformation as wood-frame rental apartments came down and sleek condo towers were erected in their place.

In 2018, the election of a new council and a new mayor kicked off the introduction of tenant protections for this hot area.

Six years later, those efforts culminated in a novel announcement at 6521 Telford Ave., the first redeveloped site to welcome old tenants back to new homes.

At the old building, 54 rental units were destroyed. Forty-nine households were qualified under the lengths of their tenancies to return to homes in the new development. Of those households, 32 returned.

“We heard loud and clear from our community that nobody should be priced out of their neighbourhood,” Mayor Mike Hurley said, standing in front of the six-storey building of replacement rentals, the first of its kind.

“That’s why the City of Burnaby can produce the strongest... suite of rental protections in our country. No one can dispute that. That’s fact.”

25
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

Last month Alberta Premier Danielle Smith tabled Bill 18, the Provincial Priorities Act, in the provincial legislature. If passed into law, the bill will give the Alberta government power to vet any agreements between the federal government and post-secondary institutions, and other “provincial entities.”

The proposed legislation could have a tremendous impact on whether scholars in Alberta can secure federal research funding. The bill would prohibit provincial entities like municipalities, post-secondary institutions and health authorities from making deals with the federal government unless they obtain approval from the province.

In terms of federal funding for Alberta universities, the Tri-Council agencies — the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council — are the main, non-partisan mechanism through which the Government of Canada funds research across disciplines.

Through these sources, faculty and graduate students obtain funding to conduct research in diverse fields that contribute to health, science and engineering and social sciences and humanities innovation and insight.

Universities across the country sign an agreement with the Tri-Council every five years on how to administer the funding.

Should the provincial government intervene in this process under Bill 18, some critics feel university research could be jeopardized.

Numerous research projects could be at risk of losing access to grants and awards, which thousands of research assistants and students rely on to support themselves and their research. It could also limit opportunities for teaching and training.

4
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/alberta

Last month Alberta Premier Danielle Smith tabled Bill 18, the Provincial Priorities Act, in the provincial legislature. If passed into law, the bill will give the Alberta government power to vet any agreements between the federal government and post-secondary institutions, and other “provincial entities.”

The proposed legislation could have a tremendous impact on whether scholars in Alberta can secure federal research funding. The bill would prohibit provincial entities like municipalities, post-secondary institutions and health authorities from making deals with the federal government unless they obtain approval from the province.

In terms of federal funding for Alberta universities, the Tri-Council agencies — the Canadian Institutes of Health Research, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council — are the main, non-partisan mechanism through which the Government of Canada funds research across disciplines.

Through these sources, faculty and graduate students obtain funding to conduct research in diverse fields that contribute to health, science and engineering and social sciences and humanities innovation and insight.

Universities across the country sign an agreement with the Tri-Council every five years on how to administer the funding.

Should the provincial government intervene in this process under Bill 18, some critics feel university research could be jeopardized.

Numerous research projects could be at risk of losing access to grants and awards, which thousands of research assistants and students rely on to support themselves and their research. It could also limit opportunities for teaching and training.

34
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

The B.C. Supreme Court has ruled that the province's COVID-19 vaccine mandate for health-care workers was justified, based on the significant risk posed by the virus when the province's mandate was renewed in October 2023.

Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry had first imposed the orders on all workers in B.C. health-care settings in October 2021. The order was renewed in 2022 and 2023, and remains in place across B.C.

According to a judgment posted Monday, around 1,800 workers lost their jobs for being unvaccinated contrary to the mandate.

Some of those workers — which included nurse practitioners, surgeons, psychiatrists and administrators — filed separate lawsuits against the province, which were all collectively heard by Justice Simon Coval.

7
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

Simon Fraser University has laid off of dozens of staff across its three B.C. campuses in Burnaby, Vancouver, and Surrey.

The university said it eliminated approximately 85 jobs since Monday due to budgetary challenges. The positions include instructors, administrative support staff, and custodial workers.

SFU announced in April it would be restructuring areas of its operations, noting it would lead to administrative job losses. The university says it is supporting impacted employees in accordance with collective agreements and labour codes, but union leaders say the process lacked empathy and transparency.

Shaneza Bacchus, president of CUPE Local 3338, said she has been in wall-to-wall meetings with laid-off union members, some of whom had worked at SFU for decades.

"They felt dehumanized. They felt that their years of service didn't matter. One of them said they felt like they were treated like a criminal," Bacchus said.

13
submitted 3 days ago by TSG_Asmodeus to c/[email protected]

The mayor of the region around Fort Nelson says he's "ecstatic" after rain began falling on the northeastern B.C. town that has been threatened by wildfires for almost a week.

Northern Rockies Regional Municipality (NRRM) Mayor Rob Fraser says fires, including the Parker Lake wildfire that forced thousands of residents to evacuate their homes, are now being better controlled.

"It's been raining for several hours here so we're extremely ecstatic about that," Fraser told CBC News from south of the town around 6:30 a.m. MT Thursday. He equated the effect of the rain as similar to a "garden hose sprinkler" over the region.

Residents, officials and wildfire crews alike have had their eyes on the weather all week as the Parker Lake fire came to around two kilometres of Fort Nelson's western boundary.

The fire, last measured at 127 square kilometres in size and still classified as out of control by the B.C. Wildfire Service (BCWS), has damaged structures on several rural properties, Fraser confirmed on Thursday.

[-] TSG_Asmodeus 5 points 3 days ago

Absolutely 100% run (don't walk!) and get The Left Hand of Darkness. It is easily one of the best sci-fi/fantasy books I have ever read.

view more: next ›

TSG_Asmodeus

joined 11 months ago