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Tablet palm rejection (programming.dev)
submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

I own a ThinkPad X1 Tablet (Gen 2) - but the only thing that matters is that it is just a tablet with a touchscreen and Wacom pen.

When doing handwriting on it (using Rnote) I become very annoyed, because as soon as the stylus loses the hover signal (only about 1.5 cm) the rest of my hand starts moving the canvas. As I tend to pull the pen far from the paper often this is really an issue.

When using Windows for the first time (with Windows Ink) I remember palm rejection working exceptionally well, even without using the pen - it just magically knows that this is part of my hand and not a finger. Also from what I remember any touch that started while the pen was hovering will not be registered even when the pen gets pulled away (you have to stop touching the screen and then touch it again)

Is there any way to improve the palm rejection on Linux (I'm using Gnome with Wayland btw) By the way, is there a way to scroll with the stylus like on Windows? And are there any good handwriting utilities for Wayland (I've only heard of CellWriter but it doesn't work well at all)?

Thanks!

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[-] [email protected] 2 points 1 month ago

Well, I think Rnote has more features and an overall better design. I tried using Xournal++ before and it was missing some features I know from all of the infinite canvas whiteboard style note taking apps

this post was submitted on 24 Apr 2024
31 points (91.9% liked)

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