[-] [email protected] 6 points 11 hours ago* (last edited 11 hours ago)

I don't know her music and only hear about her in the news. Is their an album that is musically interesting, good composition, good musicians, innovative instrumentation? I don't care about lyrics.

[-] [email protected] 5 points 11 hours ago

I imagine she hummed the theme before attacking. Dun dun, dun dun, dundundundundundun popoPOOOM!

[-] [email protected] 31 points 11 hours ago

There's probably a bunch of idealistic engineers dreaming to change the world for the better in the beginning, easily tamed by large amounts of cash when it starts to turn darker.

[-] [email protected] 3 points 1 day ago

Rename or simply discover what food actually is?

[-] [email protected] 17 points 1 day ago

I don't really care about glorifying past military victories but rather about the fact that the white flag internet meme appeared when the French government refused to follow the USA into Irak War II. https://edition.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/meast/03/07/villepin.transcript/

[-] [email protected] 118 points 1 day ago

As a French, the fact that no white flag was mentioned in these comments like it would have inevitably on reddit shows the quality of the chaps in here.

[-] [email protected] 1 points 2 days ago* (last edited 2 days ago)

@innermeerkat Pardon, mais les logiciels libres sont par essence de gauche.

Il y a peut-être des influences de gauche, mais les figures de proue comme Torvald ou Stallman n'ont jamais affiché d'affiliations politiques au-delà de leur combat pour le logiciel libre, autant que je sache.
En outre, il y a tout un tas de producteur de logiciels libres qui ne le sont clairement pas. Par exemple, les géants ou les startups de la tech de la Silicon Valley qui sont les principaux pourvoyeurs de logiciels libres et qui sont très loin de l'extrême gauche, ils sont plutôt économiquement libertariens. Ils y trouvent d'autres bénéfices que ceux provenant de la vente directe de logiciels : revue par les pairs, co-construction, image de marque, recrutement, création de standards, développement d'un écosystème favorable, etc.
Je pense qu'il faut se méfier du biais de gauche de considérer que tout ce qui a l'air humaniste et gratuit est forcément de gauche.

[-] [email protected] 10 points 2 days ago

I am afraid it looks more like an extruding pointy appendage.

[-] [email protected] 24 points 2 days ago
[-] [email protected] 1 points 2 days ago* (last edited 2 days ago)

Pas sûr que le comportement d'un second tour de législatives, où les listes préférées de certains électeurs ont été illuminées, soit comparable au tour unique des élections européennes avec tous les partis représentés.

[-] [email protected] 4 points 2 days ago

And Diderot and Montesquieu.

[-] [email protected] 14 points 3 days ago

Tankies would probably support this kind of oligarchy since it is what happens in their favorite foreign authoritarian countries. You may be confusing with revolutionary communists or something?

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submitted 4 weeks ago by [email protected] to c/atheistmemes

I think it's much more interesting to live not knowing than to have answers which might be wrong. I have approximate answers, and possible beliefs, and different degrees of uncertainty about different things, but I am not absolutely sure of anything. There are many things I don't know anything about, such as whether it means anything to ask "Why are we here?" I might think about it a little bit, and if I can't figure it out then I go on to something else. But I don't have to know an answer. I don't feel frightened by not knowing things, by being lost in the mysterious universe without having any purpose - which is the way it really is, as far as I can tell.

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submitted 1 month ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

cross-posted from: https://jlai.lu/post/6354297

They contain a sweet honey that you can taste by sucking the bottom, a friend made me taste. I just did some research about it for this post. It appears some are actually toxic, and it's very hard to tell the difference.

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submitted 1 month ago* (last edited 1 month ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

They contain a sweet honey that you can taste by sucking the bottom, a friend made me taste. I just did some research about it for this post. It appears some are actually toxic, and it's very hard to tell the difference.

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cross-posted from: https://jlai.lu/post/6118881

An illustration of the "ultra free" market in Japan, is the insane amount of ways to pay at the cashier. It seems every financial group thought they could do better than the other, and for some reason I don't understand, they didn't eat each other, they just coexist.

The main categories are: bank card, payment apps connected to bank account, transportation cards, electronic money. They may work through card reader, no-contact, bar code scan or QR code scan. For the last two, you are either scanned or you have to scan them.

Also, Japan loves "points". If you know the cashback system, where you get something like 1% of your bill back, in Japan they usually get points back, which are of course limited to shops accepting those points. So on top of payment methods you also have a dozen of points system, either specific to the shop brand or from a different company that may have agreements with different merchants.

Despite that, cash remains essential, it's very common to end up in a restaurant that only accepts cash, even the convenience of paying your house bills at the konbini requires cash.

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submitted 1 month ago* (last edited 1 month ago) by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

An illustration of the "ultra free" market in Japan, is the insane amount of ways to pay at the cashier. It seems every financial group thought they could do better than the other, and for some reason I don't understand, they didn't eat each other, they just coexist.

The main categories are: bank card, payment apps connected to bank account, transportation cards, electronic money. They may work through card reader, no-contact, bar code scan or QR code scan. For the last two, you are either scanned or you have to scan them.

Also, Japan loves "points". If you know the cashback system, where you get something like 1% of your bill back, in Japan they usually get points back, which are of course limited to shops accepting those points. So on top of payment methods you also have a dozen of points system, either specific to the shop brand or from a different company that may have agreements with different merchants.

Despite that, cash remains essential, it's very common to end up in a restaurant that only accepts cash, even the convenience of paying your house bills at the konbini requires cash.

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submitted 2 months ago by [email protected] to c/[email protected]

I'm not super convinced by the water jet. It can make a mess, it requires a lot of paper to dry if you don't want to wet your pants and if you don't have soap, are you really cleaning?
Heating seat feels like overabundance (a common thing in Japan).
But the sink to clean your hands and reuse this gray water for the next flush is amazing. I think it should be made mandatory in every region with water resources issues. It's still not clear to me, however, if using soap there will cause more maintenance issues or not.

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oce

joined 11 months ago